None of the pictures are mine, i simply like them and love to share them.
if any of these pictures are yours and I didn't credit you or if you want me to remove it, do so on "ask me anything", thank you :)

 

"المغفلة" قصة قصيرة .. للكاتب الروسي انطون شيخوف

salahmah:

منذ أيام دعوتُ الى غرفة مكتبي مربّية أولادي (يوليا فاسيليفنا) لكي أدفع لها حسابها

- قلت لها : إجلسي يا يوليا … هيّا نتحاسب … أنتِ في الغالب بحاجة إلى النقود ولكنك خجولة إلى درجة انك لن تطلبينها بنفسك .. حسناً .. لقد اتفقنا على أن أدفع لك (ثلاثين روبلاً) في الشهر

- قالت : أربعين

- قلت : كلا…

losed:

AFGHANISTAN. 2004. Voting during Afghan Presidential Elections
by Christoph Anderson

losed:

AFGHANISTAN. 2004. Voting during Afghan Presidential Elections

by Christoph Anderson

(Source: sickpage)

salahmah:

هبة عمرها 6 سنوات وهو نفس عمر صالح، نزحوا مع عائلاتهم من الغوطة الشرقية في ريف دمشق، وهم اليوم جيران في مخيم الزعتري للاجئين السوريين بالأردن.
يلعبون سوياً طوال الوقت وتقول هبة انه دائما ما يساعدها في جميع الأوقات.
World Food Programme

salahmah:

هبة عمرها 6 سنوات وهو نفس عمر صالح، نزحوا مع عائلاتهم من الغوطة الشرقية في ريف دمشق، وهم اليوم جيران في مخيم الزعتري للاجئين السوريين بالأردن.

يلعبون سوياً طوال الوقت وتقول هبة انه دائما ما يساعدها في جميع الأوقات.

World Food Programme

salahmah:

Yemeni Abu Mohammed, 73, a vendor selling traditional hats is reflected in mirrors displayed for sale at a stall, as he waits for customers in the old city of Sanaa. (Muhammed Muheisen/Associated Press)
 

salahmah:

Yemeni Abu Mohammed, 73, a vendor selling traditional hats is reflected in mirrors displayed for sale at a stall, as he waits for customers in the old city of Sanaa. (Muhammed Muheisen/Associated Press)

 

refugeeartproject:

These incredible coffee paintings are by Mohammad, a refugee from Myanmar living in Sydney. Mohammad spent over 4 years in detention centres around the country. Many of these works illustration the isolation people feel when living in detention for extensive periods of time.

reportagebygettyimages:

'The whole time, I was acutely aware that ISIS positions were never very far away, sometimes less than a mile…Wherever we went, I asked where ISIS positions were. Sometimes the answers were exact. Other times the reaction was a simple shrug and a crooked smile. I kept replaying in my mind a scene I had depressingly run into twice before — I was kidnapped by Sunni insurgents in April 2004 outside of Falluja, and by Qaddafi troops in Libya in March 2011 — where the desolate horizon turned into an impromptu checkpoint, full of masked men with guns. It is a degree of terror known only through experience, the fear of driving knowingly into the arms of possible death. The masked men shoot into the air and celebrate their prey, while they decide whether they want you dead or alive. The only difference with ISIS is that I know if they capture me, there will be little negotiation for my life. They will kill me, and in the most brutal way.'

- Reportage by Getty Images photographer Lynsey Addario writes in The New York Times about her experiences covering Iraqi Yazidis fleeing ISIS. Read more.

halftheskymovement:

“I am 19 years old and I have two children. My education was stopped due to my marriage at a young age. But now I have started studying again, because I want to be educated and I need to be,” says Manahil from Pakistan.Manahil’s voice is part of a chorus of more than 500 girls, ages 10 to 19, who have shared their challenges and dreams with the Girl Declaration, a campaign started last year by the Nike Foundation. Activists say the world’s girls are not represented in the current Millennium Development Goals, which focus on education and poverty, by failing to address child marriage, genital mutilation and adolescent pregnancy.The United Nations plans to replace the current goals with a new agenda for 2015, and activists are pushing for world leaders and policy makers to turn their attention to girls.Read more via NPR.

halftheskymovement:

“I am 19 years old and I have two children. My education was stopped due to my marriage at a young age. But now I have started studying again, because I want to be educated and I need to be,” says Manahil from Pakistan.

Manahil’s voice is part of a chorus of more than 500 girls, ages 10 to 19, who have shared their challenges and dreams with the Girl Declaration, a campaign started last year by the Nike Foundation. Activists say the world’s girls are not represented in the current Millennium Development Goals, which focus on education and poverty, by failing to address child marriage, genital mutilation and adolescent pregnancy.

The United Nations plans to replace the current goals with a new agenda for 2015, and activists are pushing for world leaders and policy makers to turn their attention to girls.

Read more via NPR.